News

NUS develops new air filtration system
Channel News Asia, May 24, 2014

A team at the National University of Singapore has developed an indoor air filtration system touted as being twice as effective as regular air purifiers — and they will hit the shelves soon.

news02 Cost-effective solution that leverages fans as air purifiers
​NUS News, May 26, 2014

A team of researchers from NUS’ Faculty of Engineering has developed a cost-effective solution for the control of indoor air pollution, especially from the haze. The development of this system is timely in light of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recent news on the risks of inhalation of particulate matter measuring less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), which has been linked to a range of cardiovascular and respiratory ailments, including cancer. The new system is easy to use and ideal for use in a range of indoor environments.

news03 NUS adapts household fans to combat haze
The Business Times, 26 May 2014

Household fans can now be used to fight the haze thanks to a filtration system developed by researchers from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) engi­neering faculty. The system, which consists of the filter and a cover, converts a fan in­to an air purifier.
The filter helps remove particulate matter measuring less than 2.5 microns in diam­eter from indoor air. Such particles, also known as PM2.5, are referred to as “fine” particles and are be­ lieved to pose the greatest health hazards.


news04 A ‘fan-tastic’ way to beat haze
​The Straits Times, May 26, 2014

People here will have a new, relatively inexpensive way to protect themselves at horne if haze returns, as feared in the next few months. Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have come up with a new indoor filtration system that can dramatically reduce levels of small toxic particles called PM2.5.


news05 Cost-effective filtration system to efficiently combat indoor air pollution
​Science Daily, May 26, 2014

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Faculty of Engineering has developed a cost-effective solution for the control of indoor air pollution, especially from the haze. The new system is easy to use and ideal for use in a range of indoor environments.